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University of Leeds Scientist Create Innovative New Product in the Fight Against Hospital Bacteria

University of Leeds Scientist Create Innovative New Product in the Fight Against Hospital Bacteria

The new self-disinfecting device – known as Surfaceskins uses a textile that disinfects itself and could be placed on hospital doors in the fight against hospital-acquired infections.

The ground-breaking device is the result of seven years of hard research and was created by a spin-out company from the University of Leeds.

Surfaceskins is a collaboration between the Nonwovens Innovation and Research Institute Ltd (NIRI) – a spin-out company from the University’s School of Design as well as two industrial designers, Adam Walker and Simon Scott-Harden.

The device works by incorporating three separate nonwoven textiles, which dispense a small quantity of alcohol gel onto the pad when it is pushed, to disinfect the surface ready for the next person to use the door.

 

The NIRI helps companies bring new textile ideas to market or to augment or improve existing products or manufacturing processes.

Mark Wilcox, Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds, who led the independent evaluation, said: “Our results suggest that Surfaceskins door pads can help to reduce the contamination of doors by microbes.”

“They offer a new way to reduce the risk of the spread of bacteria and viruses in hospital environments and other settings where frequent contact with doors could undermine hand hygiene.”

 

For more information on the NIRI visit: http://www.nonwovens-innovation.com/

For more information on Leeds University School of Design visit: http://www.design.leeds.ac.uk/

For more information on the Surfaceskins company visit http://surfaceskins.com/

 

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