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Sheffield Scientists work with national and international partners to create new drug combination to tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

Sheffield Scientists work with national and international partners to create new drug combination to tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

A team of Scientist from the University of Sheffield deliver breakthrough research which uses a new combination of antimicrobial compounds that can kill multi-drug resistant bacteria and may help address the global health crisis of antibiotic resistance.

The UK’s Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies, has declared AMR as ‘one of the greatest threats we face today’.

Professor Robert Poole and Dr Namrata Rana from the University of Sheffield conducted the new research in collaboration with partners from the University of Surrey and the University of Würzburg, Germany.

An antibiotic is a drug used to treat bacterial infections in both humans and animals. However, bacteria can change and find ways to survive the effects of an antibiotic. This has resulted in antibiotics losing their effectiveness.


Professor Robert Poole from the University of Sheffield’s Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, who was the head author of the study said, “For many years we have been developing an understanding of the modes of action against pathogens of several metal complexes, but these results are particularly striking”.

Dr Hannah Southam, a postdoctoral researcher from the University of Sheffield, explained how “Antimicrobial resistance is a global health problem. Public Health England estimates that 5,000 people die every year in England because antibiotics no longer work for some infections”.

Last week the White Rose Brussels Office attended an event in the European Parliament on Antimicrobial research, which highlighted the €200 million in the Horizon 2020 research budget earmarked for AMR.

For Further information on Antimicrobial research at the University of Sheffield please visit: https://www.shamrok.org/

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